"An idea that is not dangerous is unworthy of being called an idea at all."
Oscar Wilde

Been on Tumblr for one day, and I already want to retreat back into my hermitnism.

Not good. I need to live, and write, and finish filming the one hundred sticky notes on my wall full of unfinished projects.

Having people who get jawlines and collar bones, and cotton candy, and men with nice hands, and gay rights, and women’s rights, and Obama, and forgetting racism, and being lonely, and supporting POC, and new fashion and loving pizza and knowing the Doctor, and loving Dean and Sam…is awesome.

But, it’s not what I need anymore— for now, I’m actually okay now, and will go on to do stuff *gasp* in real life.

So, as I re-venture out thank you Tumblr for being the boyfriend I haven’t found yet, the best friend I haven’t found yet, and the pizza that I couldn’t eat because of this fucking diet.

You’ve been great.

<3

wehavenostyle:

public school ss13

wehavenostyle:

public school ss13

(via solitarymangoes)

thinkspeakstress:

zuky:


includes fascinating portrayals of casual drug use at house parties, how the author/protagonist had conversations about post-punk while seeing his mate’s band perform at some shitty small venue, internal monologues about consumerism while observing people in a mall and that time when the protagonist had an epiphany about living in the moment while walking in the rain

Also, semi-comedic accounts of skeptical but ultimately mysteriously enriching forays into yoga and Asian spirituality, quasi-lyrical adolescent descriptions of women’s bodies, self-tormented meditation on the ethics of food, a casual but seemingly deep and familiar friendship with a person of color who appears in the novel for almost an entire chapter, transcendent insights on the banality of conformist society and the immorality of wage slavery, and a crying scene where it all comes pouring out.

So basically, can I print this out and give it to my creative writing professor as a summary of the shit my classmates write, and get an A and just call it a day?

thinkspeakstress:

zuky:

includes fascinating portrayals of casual drug use at house parties, how the author/protagonist had conversations about post-punk while seeing his mate’s band perform at some shitty small venue, internal monologues about consumerism while observing people in a mall and that time when the protagonist had an epiphany about living in the moment while walking in the rain

Also, semi-comedic accounts of skeptical but ultimately mysteriously enriching forays into yoga and Asian spirituality, quasi-lyrical adolescent descriptions of women’s bodies, self-tormented meditation on the ethics of food, a casual but seemingly deep and familiar friendship with a person of color who appears in the novel for almost an entire chapter, transcendent insights on the banality of conformist society and the immorality of wage slavery, and a crying scene where it all comes pouring out.

So basically, can I print this out and give it to my creative writing professor as a summary of the shit my classmates write, and get an A and just call it a day?

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megalomanics:

wussygirl:

Icona Pop | I Love It (feat. Charli XCX)

You’re on a different road
I’m in the milky way
You want me down on Earth
But I’m up in space

MMM

FEELIN’ IT

(via megalomanics-deactivated2014022)

1 year ago  191 plays

fuckyeahriotgrrrlsofcolor:

“The worst thing about that kind of prejudice is that while you feel hurt and angry and all the rest of it, it feeds your self-doubt. You start thinking, perhaps I am not good enough.”

Nina Simone

Simone for the first time openly addressed the racial inequality that was prevalent in the United States with the song “Mississippi Goddam”, her response to the murder of Medgar Evers and the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four black children. The song was released as a single, and it was boycotted in certain southern states. ”Old Jim Crow”, on the same album, addressed the Jim Crow Laws.

From then on, a civil rights message was standard in Simone’s recording repertoire, becoming a part of her live performances. Simone performed and spoke at many civil rights meetings, such as at the Selma to Montgomery marches. Simone advocated violent revolution during the civil rights period, rather than Martin Luther King’s non-violent approach, and she hoped that African Americans could, by armed combat, form a separate state.

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rainbowpuppy:

GIFs from songofthestars, captions are mine.

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sequentialmac:

I’m having cookies as I reblog this.  Obviously.

sequentialmac:

I’m having cookies as I reblog this.  Obviously.

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SPINROUNDONMYDICK